online cricket games

Fantasy Cricket – Basics of Umpire Decision Review System

We know you are a tremendous fan of cricket and do not just stop at just watching any cricket match. Along with cricket, you also are a fan of the daily fantasy cricket games. Cricket is the sport in which the course of the game can get changed at any moment. 

And this moment of change leads you to the winning of your fantasy cricket team made at 11Wickets. You might have heard and seen many instances of the Umpire Decision Review System during the cricket matches.  

Let’s know about it better and play online cricket games installing the new 11wickets App: 

Read on: 

The Umpire Decision Review System, which is shortened as UDRS or DRS, is a technology-based system employed in cricket. The system was first introduced in Test cricket, for the only purpose of examining controversial decisions made by the on-field umpires as to if or not a batsman had been dismissed. The system was first tested in an India v Sri Lanka match in 2008, and was officially launched by the International Cricket Council (ICC) on 24 November 2009 during the first Test match between New Zealand and Pakistan at the University Oval in Dunedin. It was initially used in One Day Internationals (ODI) in January 2011, during England’s tour of Australia. 

The initial days 

The ICC initially made the UDRS necessary in all international matches, but later on made its usage optional, so that the model would only be used if both teams agree. The ICC has agreed to keep going to work on the concept and will try to include its use into all ICC events. 

In October 2012, the ICC made changes on LBW protocols, increasing the margin of doubt when the ball hits the batsman’s pad. 

In July 2016, the rules were changed once again, reducing the margin of doubt. 

The up to date rules were first used in the ODI match between Ireland and South Africa in September 2016. 

In September 2013, the ICC declared that for a trial period starting in October 2013, a team’s referrals would be reset to two after 80 overs in an innings in Test matches. Previously each team had a maximum of two not successful reviews in an innings. 

In February 2017 the ICC agreed the usage for all future ICC World Twenty20 tournaments, with one review per team. 

The first T20 tournament scheduled to make use of the concept will be the 2018 ICC Women’s World Twenty20. 

It was utilized in Knockout stages of Pakistan Super League 2017 It was the first time DRS utilized in a T20 league. 

The System 

Every team could make a maximum of two unsuccessful review requests per 80 overs in a Test match, and no more than one unsuccessful review request every innings in a ODI. A fielding team might use the system to dispute a “not out” call and a batting team might use it to dispute an “out” decision. The fielding team skipper or the batsman being dismissed creates the challenge by signalling a “T” with the arms. Once the challenge is invoked, identified, and agreed, the Third Umpire reviews the play.  

Also, at their discretion, field umpires may request the Third Umpire to review certain close calls such as line calls (to determine run outs and stumping), boundary calls (to see if a batsman hit a four or a six), or for close catch calls where neither umpire is sure if a catch was made. A challenge is only used in situations that did or could result in a dismissal: for instance, to decide if the ball is a legal catch (making contact with the batsman’s bat or glove and not touching the ground before being held by a fielder) or if a delivery made the criteria for a leg before wicket dismissal (striking the ground in line or on the off side and striking the batsman in line with a path that would have strike the wicket).  

The third umpire 

The Third Umpire reports to the on-field umpire if his analysis works with the original call, contradicts the call, or is undetermined. The on-field umpire then makes the final decision: either re-signalling a call that is standing up or revoking a call that is being turned and then making the corrected signal. Each team can start referrals up to the limit on unsuccessful reviews. 

Under the DRS regulation, only plainly incorrect decisions are turned; if the Third Umpire’s analysis is within set up margins of error or is otherwise inconclusive, the on-field umpire’s initial call stands. 

Thanks for reading! Play fantasy sports and enjoy! 

 

Read More:
1. Fantasy Cricket – Highest Totals at Sharjah Cricket Stadium
2. Factors Maximizing Chances of Winning Fantasy Cricket Games
3. Fantasy Cricket – 7 Ugly Cricket Clashes to Notice