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Fantasy Cricket – The Tale of Cricket Helmet

The daily fantasy cricket fans have noticed that in the sport, cricketers often wear a helmet to protect themselves from injury. A helmet also saves from concussion by cricket ball.

If the reader of 11wickets.com fantasy cricket platform have played cricket, they will know that a ball is very hard. It can be bowled to them at speeds over 90 miles per hour/ 140 km/h. Cricket helmets cover the whole of the skull, and have a Perspex visor to protect the face.

Even the fantasy games fans know that fielders positioned very close to batsman often wear a helmet and shin guards. Nowadays it is almost unheard of for a professional cricketer to face a fast bowler without a helmet. Meanwhile, a few batsmen prefer not to wear a helmet when facing spin bowling.

Hear the tale of helmet from us and keep playing online fantasy cricket and win prizes daily.

The beginning

There are recorded instances of cricketers using towels, scarves and padded caps to protect themselves throughout cricket history. Patsy Hendren was one of the first to use a self-designed protective hat in the 1930s. Helmets were not in common use until the 1970s. The first helmets were seen in World Series Cricket. The Englishman Dennis Amiss is the first player to consistently wear a helmet. He decided to wear helmet to save himself from lethal bowling attack of Australia and West Indies.

In 1977, he went to a motorcycle helmet manufacturer and the manufacturer came up with something lighter than the usual motorcycle helmets of those days. The helmet Amiss wore was a customised fibre-glass motorcycle helmet.

Mike Brearley was another player who wore his own design. Tony Greig was of the opinion that they would make cricket more dangerous by encouraging bowlers to bounce the batsmen. Graham Yallop of Australia was the first to wear a protective helmet to a test match on 17 March, 1978, when playing against West Indies at Bridgetown. Later Dennis Amiss of England popularised it in Test cricket. Helmets began to be widely worn thereafter.

The last batsmen at the highest (Test match) level to never wear a helmet throughout his career was Viv Richards, who retired from the international game in 1992.

After 1978, helmet gained popularity in the cricket world, in spite of the booing by the spectators. The wicket-keepers and close fielders started wearing the gear to avoid injuries. The initial helmets were heavy and produced a lot of heat due to the material used. Early helmets also had ventilation issues. Some designs also obstructed proper vision.

Art behind the design

Over the years, helmets have evolved a lot in style, design and protection. A cricket ball weighs anything between 155.9g to 163 g. It is bowled with varying speeds, touching or crossing 145kmph. Helmets nowadays are designed keeping this in mind. Modern helmets are designed to absorb the ball’s energy by becoming deformed, or dented, on impact. They contain foam injected in to the cavity between the inner and outer shells to help this.

Thanks for reading! Play fantasy sports and enjoy!

 

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