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Fantasy Cricket – History behind Duckworth-Lewis Method

Cricket and now the daily fantasy cricket is one of the popular games not only in India but also in many nations of the world.

The fantasy cricket lovers of 11wickets app and fan of cricket want to relish without any disruption, but a rain shower sometimes causes interruption.

The Duckworth Lewis technique is a set of formulas and tables developed by Frank Duckworth and Tony Lewis. The technique was implemented by the International Cricket Council (ICC) in 1999. It is to solve the problem of delayed one-day cricket matches. Again it is for factors like rain, floodlight failures and poor light. It has also been used in events that have been reduced due to sandstorms, crowd problem and even snowstorms.

The initial concept of the method

The basic concept is that each team in limited-overs match has two assets on hand to make runs. Wickets remaining and overs to play. When overs are lost, putting an adjusted target is not as easy. It is to reduce the batting team’s run target proportionally, as a team batting 2nd with ten wickets in hand. And 25 overs to play can be expected to play more boldly. It is than 1 with 10 wickets and a full 50 overs, and can reach a higher run rate. The Duckworth-Lewis approach is an undertaking to set statistically reasonable target for second team’s innings. Depending on the score accomplished by the first team, taking their wickets lost and overs played into consideration.

Using a publicized table which gives the percentage of these combined resources left over for any number of overs. Or, more accurately, balls, remaining and wickets lost, the target score can be adjusted up or down. It is to reveal the loss of resources to one or both teams when a match is reduced one or more times. This percentage is then used to determine a target (sometimes called a ‘par score’). This is generally a fractional number of runs. If the second team passes the target, then the second team is taken to have won the match. If the match ends when the second team has precisely met (but not exceeded). The target (rounded down to the following integer) then the cricket match is taken to be a tie.

Instances of Duckworth Lewis

Instance of such a tied match was found in the ODI between England and India on 11 September 2011. This match was often interrupted by rain in the final overs, and a ball-by-ball calculation of the Duckworth-Lewis ‘par’ score played a key role in the proper decisions made during those overs. At one point, India was ahead depending to this calculation, during one rain hold off (and would have won if play was unable to be resumed). At a second rain time period, England, who had scored some quick runs, exactly as they were aware of the need to get ahead in terms of D/L would correspondingly have won if play hadn’t started again. Play was at last called off with just 7 balls of the match remaining and England’s score equal to the Duckworth-Lewis ‘par’ score, as a result resulting in a tied match.

This example does reveal how important and challenging the decisions of the umpires can be, in terms of evaluating at specifically what point the rain is heavy enough to explain ceasing play. If they had done so one ball earlier, England would have been ahead on D/L, and so would have won the match, equally, if play had halted one ball later, without England scoring off that ball, India would have won the match – suggesting how finely-tuned D/L calculations can be in such situations.

Match probable format implementing the method

For 50-over matches, each team must face at least 20 overs before D/L can decide the game. And for T20 games, each side must face at least five overs before D/L can decide the game. If this requirement cannot be met, the match ends to no result.

In contrast to the belief in some quarters, it doesn’t require a degree in maths either to understand it or to use it! Even though a purpose-written computer program is available to nations implementing the system to permit calculations to be performed speedily and correctly, this is not required. All calculations can simply be done using nothing more than a single table of numbers and a pocket calculator.

Thanks for reading! Play fantasy sports and enjoy!

 

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