online fantasy cricket

Fantasy Cricket – History behind various Cricket Terms

Cricket is full of interesting terms. We use those terms while playing the daily fantasy cricket matches. But a lot of us do not know the tales linked to the terms. 

Take a glance at those terms and their little tale before you begin to make you playing XI for the online fantasy cricket team at 11Wickets App the next time. Read on: 

Googly 

The English term for a wrong-un. It is called this as evidently, it caused the batsman’s eyes to goggle. 

Popping Crease 

Underneath the guidelines of cricket in the 1700s, a batting player had to place his bat right into a hole cut in the turf to score a run. The wicketkeeper/fielders needed to get the ball inside the hole prior to the bat to be able to impact a run-out. This hole was referred to as popping hole (just as popping the bat/ball in it), but following too many fielders had their fingers damaged by the batsman banging his bat into the hole all at once as the fielder’s hand, it had been decided to replace the hole to a line. The name taking hole then evolved into popping crease. 

Crease 

Following the popping hole ran out the window, a crease (or hole in the ground) was really cut into the grass. This persisted until the mid-1860s whenever they began applying white paint. 

Umpire  

The word umpire evidently stems from the French ‘nompere’ which means ‘not equal’ or ‘odd man’. This is to imply that the ‘odd man’ is called in to make decisions between two contestants. 

Slips 

Slips come from early times, with mention to these fielders cover ‘slips from the bat’. 

Point 

This is a restriction of the expression ‘point of the bat’, a position anywhere the fielder stands near to the end of the bat. 

Gully 

Mentions to the opening or ‘gully’ that occurs amid the slips and point 

Cover 

Refers to the position that ‘covers’ the point and middle of the wicket 

Mid-off and mid-on 

Shortenings of the terms ‘middle wicket off’ and ‘middle wicket on’ 

Silly Mid On 

the mid-on is self-explanatory; however, it is believed that the silly refers to an old definition of silly, meaning ‘defenceless’. 

Third Man 

This is named because it was a position brought in with all the advent of over-arm bowling, and the cricketer supplemented the pre-existing placement of slip and point, therefore becoming the ‘third man’ around the off-side. 

Yorker 

There are different meanings of Yorker. The one which appears to have sensible credence relates to Tom Emmett, a highly successful Yorkshire bowler in the 1800s. He was very accomplished to bowl full balls at the exploding crease, and known as ‘Yorkers‘ as that is what batsmen had to manage with when they went to Yorkshire. 

Maiden Over 

Though most people link ‘maiden’ with the female, an additional meaning is ‘unproductive’. So, an unproductive over in cricket (i.e. one with no runs scored) is a maiden. 

Wicket 

Comes from the old English definition of a wicket being a small gate. Cricket is believed to have its origins with shepherds, and very probably they used the gate on pens as the target to bowl at. 

Bail 

It was initially a French word that defined the top part of the gate of a sheep pen. 

Bosie 

This term was used in the early 1900s in Australia to describe the wrong-un. It was so-called in deference to B.J.T. Bosanquet, who is believed to be the inventor. 

Thanks for reading! Play fantasy sports and enjoy! 

 

Read More:
1. Fantasy Cricket – Highest Totals at Sharjah Cricket Stadium
2. Fantasy Cricket – 7 Suspended Teams Not Playing International Cricket
3. Fantasy Cricket – 7 Ugly Cricket Clashes to Notice